Amsterdam | Minolta X-700

Someday, I’ll live in the country side… With endless fields, forests and waters. But for now, I’m glad to be living in the exact opposite. There is something about fast city madness. The sea of everchanging people and places, where life ceases to stop for just one moment.

Minolta X-700, Vivitar Series 1 24-70 mm / 3.8-4.8, DM Paradies 200 (35mm, ISO 200), Canon Canon MP560

Minolta X-700 – Take I

So here’s a little sample of my first go with the X-700. Happy with it so far!
I only used programmed automatic and shot them all within 2 hours. So there certainly wasn’t a whole lot of thinking/planning/creativity involved… Simply trying to get the feel of it.

And it feels goood!
Can’t wait to go out on the streets and shoot some more.

Things used: Vivitar Series 1 24-70 mm / 3.8-4.8 and 70-210 mm 2.8-4.0, DM Paradies 200 (35mm, ISO 200) – very cheap film, Canon Canon MP560
Find all of it: https://www.flickr.com/photos/selinaboye/sets/72157653901133176

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New Toys!

I am happy as a kid, because I just got me some new toys! One of them being a SLR Minolta X-700, plus Vivitar Series 1 24-70 mm / 3.8-4.8 and Vivitar Series 1 70-210mm 2.8-4.0. The owner sold it to me for less that 40€ (so very very grateful for that). Right now I’m just trying to figure everything out and will soon head out to shoot that first roll of film. It is a beautiful camera and very nice to handle.

Thought I was ready to up my game in film photography, since I wasn’t really getting anywhere new with my ‘point and shoot’ Ricoh TF-900. It was starting to become an aimless enterprise. The X700 will definitely help me understand a lot more about photography and its ulterior mechanisms. And since you can’t just release the shutter (well actually you can, but that’ll come at a cost) I will have to sit down and LEARN. It was one of the last cameras without autofocus, so I’ll have to adjust that manually from now on.

I’ll be sharing the lessons learned, the fatal mistakes made and of course the successes!

The second thing: A mountainbike! Working a summerjob in Hamburg and having to cycle at least 30k on a daily basis, I figured it would be nice to invest in something better than my old Holland bike. I once took that old thing to the city, but it sure isn’t used to the ridiculously bumpy bikeways of Hamburg and nearly broke down. Say hello to Mrs. Kuwahara Cougar, fresh from the 90’s. The first 300k were already worth the money!

Funny coincidence that both the camera and the bike are 1) older than me and 2) designed and manufactured in Japan. Seriously, at times I feel like a Hipster in denial. But I guess it’s just where cupid’s arrow lands…

“Jack of all trades – master of none”

Jacks of all trades, generalists, “Hans Dampf in allen Gassen”, whatever you might choose to call it; if you have no idea what I am talking about – I am referring to those kinds of people who are reasonably competent with a variety of skills, but who don’t stick out in a particular one. It’s almost like a trade-off; either be reasonably good at many things or master one (or a few) particular skill(s). Being a generalist as opposed to being a specialist. If you find yourself having an exceptionally long list of passions and interests that also seems to be subject to constant transformation …you might want to start calling yourself a “Jack” also. Other potential symptoms? Continue reading

Building a green roof

Last weekend I helped building some green roofs on top the houses at Vereniging Aardehuis in Olst, Holland. Now I have a basic idea of how to build one, that I would like to share with you… But before you hasten to decide to build anything like that, you’d have to make sure that your roof can handle all this extra weight.

However, once it’s there it creates an aesthetical landscape, serves as a little natural habitat for our insect fellows and on a summer’s day you can even climb up your roof and enjoy the sunshine from up there. It doesn’t have to be expensive (around 100-300€) and will also provide you with some insulation.

Here’s how we did it… Continue reading